Royal Panda roulette

Reversed Labouchere with Stop Loss

In 1999 Mr Oops, a notable figure in the roulette web community, presented the following variation of Reverse Labouchere.

This page describes some ideas for a variation of the Reversed Labouchere positive (or mixed) progression betting scheme, with a “stop-loss handler”. This handling of the line has the benefit of telling you when you have lost too many wins to continue, if you want to save some. Also; this system does not suffer from the “One Loss Crosses Out Two Winnings” problem, that the normal Reversed Labouchere suffers from. This system is also very flexible as the user can change the rules of the system while using it.

The following text presumes that you are already familiar with the Reversed Labouchere. It is stressed that the contents of this text is a Basic Idea for a progression and, as it can be varied in countless ways – also while using it – it is not complete! Anyone interested will, though, get as much information as necessary for setting up a personal plan, using parts or all of the below. There is also an example of a “complete” plan at the end of the text. Readers are encouraged to read the full text in order to understand the necessity of some of the basic concepts, before developing/testing own versions.

The first problem to eliminate is the “One Loss Crosses Out Two Winnings” problem. That can, I’m sure, be done in several ways – this is one of them: Split the net win into two parts. The benefit from this operation is, that whenever you cross out two figures, you will cross out two parts of two won bets, in effect crossing out one bet (although only by the number – not units).

We are also splitting the line into two parts, using a Bar ( I ) AND always use the rightmost figure of each part for the bet:

2 I 2 First bet (2 + 2) 4

Win and split into two parts. If we split it into 2 + 2 means no progression, therefore the 4 units are split 1 + 3:

1 2 I 2 3 Next bet (2 + 3) 5

Next bet is 5 as that is the sum of the rightmost figures of each part of the line, separated by the Bar, but the splitted win, is put at both ends of the whole line! One thing here: The figure placed to the left must always be smaller (by 1 unit or more) than the left PART of the bet, to achieve progression. Supposing the next bet (5) is won, the left part of the bet is 2 and the line looks like:

1 1 2 I 2 3 4 Next bet (2 + 4) 6

In the case of a loss, the 2 and the 4 are crossed out and the line looks like:

1 1  I 2 3 Next bet (1 + 3) 4

Where is the stop-loss handler? If the last bet (4) is won, it is to be split into two parts, of which one is to be smaller than the left part of the bet – that is 1, as the two parts are 1 + 3. But a zero is not to be placed on the line! The session is over! There was one loss and then when there was a winning spin the session ended. The figure to the left of the bar in the starting line, subtracted by one, will determine how many sequences of losses will be accepted before ending a session after a win (if you have a line long enough to handle the losses), as the smaller part of the bet will be lower for each sequence of losses. As there was a 2 to the left of the line only one sequence of losses was allowed and the session ended when there was the first win after the loss. This is a built-in stop-loss handler.

There is also a possibility to build a stop-loss handler into the line, simply by making the Bar moveable. Suppose the Bar moves one step (not crossed-out figure) to the right for, for example, every two winnings, a sequence (very constructed and another line) could look like this:

Starting the line: 2 I 3 First bet (2 + 3) 5
Win and split: 1 2 I 3 4 Next bet (2 + 4) 6
Win and split: 1 1 2 I 3 4 5 Two wins – move Bar
Bar is moved: 1 1 2 3 I 4 5 Next bet (3 + 5) 8

Two things are achieved here: The bet did a jump up by two units, instead of one as previous, and also – very important – the smaller part of the bet got bigger! The rightmost figure to the left of the Bar is now 3 instead of 2, making it possible to, if the bet is won, put a 2 on to the left end of the line if that is desired.

The Bar is now the stop-loss handler. As it moves to the right, it will preserve the two leftmost figures of the line in case of losses because when all figures to the right of the current bar are crossed out the session ends, because the next bet is supposed to be the sum of the rightmost figures of both ends of the line, but there is no rightmost figure to the right of the Bar.

This handling of the Bar will allow as many losses as half of the winnings (in numbers – not units) – greater part if odd – plus one. (The one is determined by half of the number of figures in the starting line – greater part if odd) Note: This is a “running count” meaning that the loss/win ratio is calculated of the totals, from session start, at any point.

One alternative could be to move the Bar at first win and then wait and move it every second. That would allow for as many losses as half of the winnings – smaller part if odd – plus one. This is the difference to the above:

Starting the line: 2 I 3 First bet (2 + 3) 5
Win and split: 1 2 I 3 4 Move Bar now
Bar is moved: 1 2 3 I 4 Next bet (3 + 4) 7
Win and split: 1 1 2 3 I 4 6 Next bet (3 + 6) 9

When moving the Bar already at first win, the left two figures of the line are preserved if the second bet should be lost. As there is only one figure to the right of the Bar, the session ends and the bankroll is reduced by 2 units. To compare with the above example, a loss on second spin would reduce the sum of the line by 6 but would not end the session. Another loss would be needed for that and then that session ends with a loss of 5 units. And a second loss in the latter example would be a loss of 5, as another session is started but immediately lost, thus making the total loss 7 units. In this very specific example.

The Bar can be moved at any interval, as desired, making it an option during actual play to move it. The Bar is moving to preserve the left end of the line in case of losses – the user has to decide how many; in beforehand by setting up a rule of when to move and/or ad hoc when playing. The number of accepted future losses is readily seen on the line as it is the number of un-crossed figures right of the Bar. And as that many losses crosses out the same number of figures to the left of the line, it is very easy to see how much will be left of the session bankroll in case of a total loss.

The preserved figures are so small! 1) Don’t be greedy when gambling! 2) In both examples above, one can see that eventually the smaller part of the bet will be 3 instead of 2. This opens up for options. As said before; the figure put to the left end of the line is to be smaller than the figure to the left of the Bar (making the left part of the bet). But how much smaller, is for the user to decide. In both cases above, if the last bet is won the left part of the bet is 3 (3 + 5 and 3 + 6 resp) and this makes it possible to choose between adding a 1 or a 2 to the left end of the line. Adding more means a possible saving in case of repeated losses but in case of repeated winnings it means that the bet will progress more moderately.

As you understand, this system can be varied forever. The length of the starting line, the sum of the figures of the starting line and the value of each one, where to put the Bar and when to move it… Try it! Test different versions on the same spins and maybe you find a suitable one…

Kavouras’ version of the Reversed Labouchere with Stop Loss is as follows:

Let’s say we start with the sequence 1,2,3,4.
We put a bar in the middle:
1,2 | 3,4
We bet the sum of the 2 left numbers of the two parts. We bet 2+4=6
If we win we add the win to the right end of the right part:
1,2 | 3,4,6
We bet the sum of the 2 left numbers of the two parts. We bet 2+6=8
If we win we add the win to the right end of the right part:
1,2 | 3,4,6,8
We bet the sum of the 2 left numbers of the two parts. We bet 2+8=10
If we win we add the win to the right end of the right part:
1,2 | 3,4,6,8,10
Now, we move the Bar one step to the right! We do that every third consecutive win!

1,2, 3 | 4,6,8,10
And we bet 3+10=13
If we win the line becomes
1,2, 3 | 4,6,8,10,13
Next bet: 3+13=16
etc.

You need to understand that:

When any of the two parts get written off the attack ends. This means for example that from this point 1,2, 3 | 4,6,8,10 after 3 consecutive  losses we will reach this point: – | 4 Here we end the attack. We take 4 units, but we have initially invested 1+2+3+4=10 units, so we end the attack with -6 units. This may seem absurd but it isn’t. First you must understand that in reverse Labouchere the norm is that you lose your attack most of the time anyway. Without the stop loss bar, every lost session would have cost you 10 units, but thanks to the Bar we lost only 6 units in this lost attack. Secondly the benefits of the Bar are more prominent after having a great start with many wins and then facing losses. In such a case the traditional reverse Labouchere would wipe out all your units to a loss of 10 units. In the stop loss Bar version you can end the same attack with PROFIT. This is because the two parts of your sequence would not be equal in length.
Let’s say you have a great start in your attack and you have reached this point:
1,2,3,4| 6,8,10,13,16,19
In this case if we face 4 consecutive losses our sequence becomes – | 6,8, and we end the attack with 14 units. 14- our initial 10 units = 4 units profit.

In the  original reverse Labouchere you either win really BIG (very rarely) or you lose the sum of your starting sequence (very often). The stop loss bar version gives you the opportunity to finish an attack with some units, even if you have not reached the BIG win. This does not mean that the original Rev Labby is a worse progression. It is just more aggressive; it is an all or nothing system.

kingbet casino
'